Local History Photos January 29, 2021

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week; and this week I’m doing something a little different. There is a Facebook page, Old Corning Area Photos, which showcases – you guessed it! Photos of Corning in days gone by! And in the last week there has been quite a discussion about the 1893 Harry Heerman’s map of Corning. The Southeast Steuben County Library has this map in our local history archive and I’ve taken a couple of photos of the map which are best viewed on a reasonable sized monitor.

These photos offer a really cool look at a map detailing what Corning looked like at the turn of the Twentieth Century – enjoy!

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, February 5, 2021.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

References

Ek, D., 2021. Developers Eye Northside Blodgett For Apartments. [online] The-leader.com. Available at: <https://www.the-leader.com/article/20140327/News/140329605#:~:text=Northside%20Blodgett,%20located%20on%20Princeton%20Avenue%20in%20Corning,,Purcell%20of%20Watertown%20for%20just%20over%20$1%20million.> [Accessed 22 January 2021].

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos January 22, 2021

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January 29, 2021.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Horse & Carriage Transportation!

Our first photo shows the old time transportation of a horse and carriage. The photo was obviously taken in Penn Yan on Monday, July 26, 1897.

Local History Photo 2: Bird’s Eye view of Pulteney Street

 

Our second photo for this week shows a bird’s eye view o f Pulteney Street evidently in the late 1920s – we can be fairly certain of that time frame as Northside Blodgett was completed in 1927 and the notation on the photo indicates it was then the “new North Side High School.”

Local History Photo 3: Old Corning Headquarters Building

Our final photo for this week shows an old Corning office building in the aftermath of the Flood of ’72. The building was located ion the south side of the Chemung River and took up part of the acreage where the modern and larger Corning headquarters building was later built.

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

References

Ek, D., 2021. Developers Eye Northside Blodgett For Apartments. [online] The-leader.com. Available at: <https://www.the-leader.com/article/20140327/News/140329605#:~:text=Northside%20Blodgett,%20located%20on%20Princeton%20Avenue%20in%20Corning,,Purcell%20of%20Watertown%20for%20just%20over%20$1%20million.> [Accessed 22 January 2021].

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos January 15, 2021

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January 22, 2021.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Pine Street in Painted Post

Our first photo shows a view of Pine Street in Painted Post between the cross streets of Charles and Rand Avenue back in 1921!

Local History Photo 2: Train Wreck!

 

Our second photo for this week is of a local train wreck!

The photo was taken at an unknown local location in 1888.

Local History Photo 3: Woeppel’s Flower House

Our third photo for this week shows the old Woeppel Flower House once located on Park Avenue in Corning.

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos January 8, 2021

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January 15, 2021.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

 

 

Local History Photo 1: Northside Blodgett

Our first photo for this week shows the old Northside Blodgett school in Corning in the days of old. I’d guess the 1930s by the car and the fact that there doesn’t seem to be a house built yet on the corner where the photographer was standing – and of course, today there are houses on that entire block across from where the school once stood.

 

 

Local History Photo 2: Flooded Road

 

Our second photo for this week shows a flooded road located somewhere between Corning and Painted Post in July of 1935.

 

 

Local History Photo 3: Opera House Postcard

And our final photo for this week is of a postcard showing the old Corning Opera House that was once located on Pine Street somewhere between what was then Erie Avenue and First Street. Erie Avenue eventually underwent a name change and became Denison Parkway.

 

 

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

 

 

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos December 18 & 25, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

This is a special, multi-photo end of the year edition!

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January 1, 2021.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Photo 1: CFA Football Team

The Corning Free Academy Football Team circa 1900.

Photo 2: H.P. Sinclair Factory

The old Sinclair Factory in Corning circa 1906. The factory was located in the lot that today houses Dunkin’ Donuts.

Photo 3: Birds Eye View of Corning

A photo of a postcard showing a birds eye view of Corning from Gibson.

Photo 4: The Gridley Family

A photo of the local Gridley Family taken in Oneida, N.Y. in 1926; from left to right Mable, Myron, Nellie & Herbert Gridley.

Photo 5: Caton Methodist Episcopal Church Members

We don’t know exactly when this photo was taken; however, it is a cool photo showing members of the Caton Methodist Church, and it was probably taken in the early twentieth century.

Photo 6: Firetruck (and fireman too!)

A neat photo of a firetruck, and an unknown fireman, in the early twentieth century.

Photo 7: William Harrison House

Our seventh photo shows the William Harrison House circa 1930. If you know where the house was, or is as the case may be – let us know! The car the people are standing in front of the house are neat too – we have no information on the people in the photo; they may, or may not be the Harrison Family!

Photo 8: Lumber Industry

This photo obviously has a water stain on it. However, I wanted to include it because is shows an old lumber factory in Gang Mills. And we forget today, how big a deal the lumber industry was in our area in the nineteenth century!

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos December 11, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, December 18, 2020.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Our photos for this week show trains that passed through our area in the days of old. Our records don’t indicate where exactly the trains stopped; however, the photos are cool for the view of the train age and the neat old-style clothing the people in the photos are wearing – not to mention the trains themselves as trains are cool!

Local History Photo 1: Train

 

 

Local History Photo 2: Train Too

 

 

Local History Photo 3: And Yet Another Train

 

 

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos December 4, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, December 11, 2020.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Denison Park

Our first photo for this week shows Denison Park at sometime in the past.

It looks like a fun picnic was being held, early in the twentieth century.

 

 

Local History Photo 2: Corning Baseball Team

Our second photo for this week shows a Corning baseball team in the early twentieth century.

 

 

Local History Photo 3: First Street Home

And our final photo for this week shows a home on First Street in Corning, at some time in the past – our records don’t indicate when – but I believe I’ve driven by the house in the past!

It might make a cool weekend walking assignment; walk down First Street in Corning and look for the house in the photo!

 

 

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos November 27, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, December 4, 2020.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: “Construction”

The record for our first photo for this week has a very brief description; it says simply “Construction.”  However, just what is being constructed or where, specifically, it is being constructed isn’t clear. However, whether it is the factory buildings or the railroad that are being worked on, construction-wise, it is a neat photo of whichever factory of the Southern Tier is shown in days gone by!

Local History Photo 2: New York Central & Hudson River Railroad Yards

Our second photo for this week shows the old New York Central & Hudson River railway yards that were once found in the City of Corning.

It is hard to believe today, what a railroad busy place Corning was back in the day!

Local History Photo 3: “Flood”

Our third photo for this week also has a simple description – it is titled simply “Flood”, and that is all the information found on the item record.

I’m guessing, in peering closely at the clothing the people are wearing that this photo, that it just might have been taken in 1972 – but where the photo was taken is a mystery!

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos November 20, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, November 27, 2020.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Viewer’s Note: This week, all three local history photos feature completely blank description cards – so we know they were taken in Corning at some time in the past – but when is a mystery!

Local History Photo 1: Market Street circa 1940s

Our first photo for this week offers a true window into the past; showing West Market Street in the 1940s. Specifically, we’re looking at Deluxe Dairy Products, Inc. located at 99 West Market Street and Ward Williams, Frigidaire Appliances located at 93-95 West Market Street. The street view is cool and those now vintage cars are too!

Local History Photo 2: Painted Post in 1896

Our second photo for this week, is another photo of a photo from the library’s photo archive – but what a cool birds-eye view of the Painted Post! We see the Indian Monument in the foreground, and man driving a horse-drawn carriage in front of that; and the background a streetcar and a man lazily leaning against a lamp post! I can’t see what is going on in the lot on the other side of the street from the monument but perhaps someone with sharper eagle eyes can take a look and figure it out!

Local History Photo 3: First Street in Corning

Our final photo for this week has a description card that is less informative than would be ideal; we don’t know what year the photo was taken – but it is super cool nonetheless! The view shows an unpaved East First Street in Corning looking westward from what the description card notes is the “Columbia Street area.”

I don’t recognize the building on the left and it may have been torn down decades ago…

And if you recognize exactly where the photo was taken – let us  know!

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos November 13, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

The next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, November 20, 2020.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Viewer’s Note: This week, all three local history photos feature completely blank description cards – so we know they were taken in Corning at some time in the past – but when is a mystery!

Photos of the Week:

As I’ve run out of week, and am still trying to catch up, here are several photos from our local history archive that show a postcard, the aftermath of the Flood of 1972 as well as a group of students at C.F.A. and some somberly dressed ladies in black!

 

Have a good weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Research & Learning: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!