Local History Photos March 27, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Baseball Game

Our first photo for this week, shows a baseball game that was held in Corning on September 4, 1896! The photo was donated by the Drake Family.

 

 

Local History Photo 2: Construction Crew

Our second photo for this week shows a local construction crew at some time in the past! Our record for this photo only states that it was donated by “DPW.”

So if you have eagle eyes and recognize where the photo was taken, please let us know!

 

 

Local History Photo 3: Horse & Carriage

Our third photo for this week was also donated to the library by the Drake Family. And although our record card for this photo doesn’t contain any additional information, I believe we can safely say it was taken somewhere on the Southside Hill of Corning, as we can clearly see the old Corning Glass Works factory in the background! What a neat photo!

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

Online Resources: Lynda.com, Databases, Etc.

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

In relation, I’m working on a basic walk-through tutorial for Heritage Question and will have that ready to share next week.

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos March 20, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week. I’m still getting used to working from home, so, I’ll work on a beefier posting for next week, but for now – here are a couple of photos for your weekend viewing pleasure.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photos 1 & 2: Eisenhower

I know General Eisenhower visited Corning, but I’m not sure when, and our records for these photos don’t indicate the year. But I’m guessing he visited Corning in the late 1940s or early 1950s since he is still wearing a military uniform – I’m guessing he hadn’t yet been elected president.

If you know anything about General/President Eisenhower’s visit to Corning, please let us know.

 

 

Local History Photo 3:

Our third photo for this week shows Second Street in Corning, looking east from Cedar Street, year unknown.

 

 

Local History Photo 4: Postcard of Corning Glass Works

And our final photo for this week is of a postcard showing the old Corning Glass factory in the days of old.

 

 

Enjoy the photos and stay safe everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos March 13, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Market Street

Our first photo for this week shows unpaved Market Street, year unknown – but in a time before cars!

 

 

Local History Photo 2: First Bank & Trust Company

Our second photo for this week shows part of Centerway Square and the First Bank & Trust Company sometime in the 1970s.

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos March 6, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Horse & Carriage In Centerway Square

Our photos for this week are both street scenes.

The first photo shows a horse and carriage in front of the Clock Tower in Centerwary Square. The Clock Tower is still there; however, the rest of the square looks quite different as the building to the left of the tower was subsequently demolished and replaced with more than one new building. Today that area houses the building that used to be the Baron Steuben Hotel and, further back, a municipal parking garage. And I believe one of the buildings to the right of the Clock Tower was later demolished, but the other building, the one just to the right of the carriage, is still there.

And of course, the unpaved streets have been paved since the photo was taken.

What a neat view of how life used to be in Corning!

Local History Photo 2:

Our second photo for this week shows a streetcar, in the days of old, turning a corner at one of the intersections in Corning. The record for the photo doesn’t indicate exactly where the photo was taken, so if you have eagle eyes and recognize the house behind the streetcar and where it is located, please let us know!

And again, what a cool photo!

You can see the back of the conductor, in his conductor’s uniform, getting on the streetcar, the family sitting on the porch and porch steps in the background, and the man in the hat walking across the street who seems to be wearing a flat straw hat!

 

 

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos February 28, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

 

 

Local History Photo 1: Market Street

Our first photo shows a section of lower Pine Street looking toward the clock tower in Centerway Square – in the pre-auto days with horses and carriages!

 

Local History Photo 2:

Our second photo for this week shows the Corning Glass factory complex, in the day of old, with part of the Henry Clay Coal company building seen in the foreground. The area the buildings were located in is near where the modern Corning Incorporated headquarters building is today – near Centerway Square.

 

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos February 21, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

 

 

This week we’re showcasing three photos from our archive for which we have no description information whatsoever!

 

We don’t know when or where the photos were taken – so please take a look and let us know if you recognize the location the photos were taken.

 

We’d love to update our records to include that information!

 

 

Local History Photo 1: Unknown Church

I’ve lived in Corning most of my life, and at middle age I believe I’ve seen all the churches that are currently standing in the City of Corning.

However, I don’t recognize this church! So the church either isn’t currently standing in the City of Corning (unless I’ve missed seeing it!) or, it is, just perhaps, located in a nearby city or town…

And I’m betting someone out there is going to recognize this church! If you do, please let us know!

 

Local History Photo 2: The Island

There is an island in the Chemung River, that you can see from the Centerway Bridge in Corning; and of course, small island in rivers do come and go. However, the island in the photo looks like it is in a more rural location than the City of Corning even in the days of old. So, I’m speculating that the The Island isn’t, and wasn’t, located in the City of Corning itself, but perhaps in a nearby town or village.

If you know where The Island is/was located – please let us know!

Local History Photo 3: Laborer

In our third photo for this week we see an obviously hard working man!

However, what this laborer is doing and where he is working are a mystery.

If you recognize the location the photo was taken, the type of machinery being used or even if you know who the man in the photo was – please let us know!

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos February 14, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

 

Local History Photo 1

Our first photo for this week shows Centerway Square in the days of old, with the old Corning Glass factory in the background. What a neat photo!

Local History Photo 2

And our second photo for this week shows a postcard of the old Corning Glass Works plant in the days of old!

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!