Local History Photos January 21, 2022

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Local History photos are published on Fridays; and the next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January, 28, 2022.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: Construction Project In Pine Street Square

Our first photo for this week shows some type of construction project in the area that was once Pine Street Square, before they built a bridge across the river at Pine Street and the square transitioned into Centerway Square.

Our records don’t indicate when the photo was taken, although it might have been during the 1930s or 1940s judging by the glimpse of the car that can be seen at the right side of the photo.

Local History Photo 2: Corning Glass Works Factory Buildings (date unknown)

Our second photo for this week shows Corning Glass Works factory buildings during an era of high water!

Local History Photo 3: Reading On The Sidewalk (circa late 1800s)

Our third photo for this week is one of my favorites, of all the photos in the Local History archive!

It shows a young man reading on the raised wooden sidewalk in Corning sometime in the past. The photo is undated, but I would estimate it was taken in the late 19th Century by the fact that there aren’t any cars to be seen in the background – just horses and carriages.

Old Newspaper Article of the Week

CORNING’S NEW POST OFFICE OPENED TODAY

Federal Building Erected at Cost of $50,000 is a Monument to the City – J. D. McGannon Buys First Stamp.

From The Evening Leader, Corning, N.Y. | January 10, 1910

The first two columns of the article:

And the second two columns of the article:

Here is the text of the article, and in a few places the words are unreadable and in those few cases you’ll see dashes — to signify the word wasn’t readable – but what a neat article on the opening of the grand new Post Office in 1910. A post office that is still in operation, as that location, more than 100 years later!

CORNING’S NEW POST OFFICE OPENED TODAY
Federal Building Erected at Cost of $50,000 is a Monument to the City – J. D. McGannon Buys First
From The Evening Leader, Corning, N.Y. | January 10, 1910 | Page Three

     The Corning Post Office began doing business regularly today at the new  — building at Erie Avenue and Walnut Streets.

     Sunday the regular hours were observed at the old Post Office, but as soon as the windows had been closed down all was bustle and hurray within: for the office had to be moved to its new location without any interruption in service.  The –, mails documents, etc., were all that had to be removed, the fixates and furnishings of the old Post Office belonging to James A. Drake, the owner of the building.

     The government’s property was loaded onto the drays of the C. R. Maltby Company and transferred to its new quarters, the clerics of the office working all day at process of settling.

     Sunday hundreds of persons visited the lobby of the new Post Office and not a few were accorded the privilege of a trip behind the scenes through the courtesy of Postmaster Charles McIntosh.  All were loud in their praise of the new building from an artistic point of view.  The government has certainly done well by Corning and the new Post Office as a monument of which the city may well feel proud.

     The lobby of the office which occupies the front of the building and the entire north side, is furnished in oak which has been finished by rubbing it until it presents the appearance of another wood.  The flooring is mosaic.  Handsome electric fixtures are provided from ac lights ranging from the ceiling by heavy chains and artistic design. 

     The carriers windows, four in number, are located at the front of the lobby opposite the entrance.  On the north of the building are the general delivery and the stamp windows, the lock boxes and call boxes.  The money order and registry departments occupy a small room by themselves at the northwest corner of the building.

     Postmaster H. H. Pratt has his private office located at the left of the main entrance.  It is approached by a private entry way.

     Within the work room of the office the clerks complain that they are in crowded quarters, the bulky equipment provided in such generous quantities by the government affording no superfluous room and sometimes actually handicapping any easy movement. There are new cases for the city an rural carriers and a — — for the carriers the city newspapers and other large concerns.  There are also new sorting cases.

     The clerks at the stamp window each have a compartment in a safe to which they alone possess the combination.  Each clerk keeps his stamps and his own receipts in the compartment allotted him and is responsible for his own accounts and vaults are provided in generous numbers all over the building.

     There is a retiring room with marble walls for young lady clerks through none are employed at present.

     In the basement there is a rest room for carries fitted up with tables and chairs.  Here the carriers stay when off duty. The  government has provided shower bath facilities in connection.

     The government made an appropriation for the site for the building now completed in 1903, Congressman Charles W. Gillet succeeding in getting the appropriation made.  The appropriate for the construction of the building was secured during Congressman J. Sloat Fassett’s term.  950,000 being set aside for this purpose.  The contract price for the building was $843,000. The fixtures and furnishings are provided by the government.

     The German Evangelical Church which obstructed the site was razed and the ground broken for the new building early in the spring of 1908.  The building is not yet wholly complete as the painters and finishers are still at work in the interior.

     The first stamp sold at the new office was issued Sunday afternoon to John D. McGannon of Walnut Street. G. Wharton Robertson making the sale.

     This morning the keys for the lock boxes were given out at the office. The number of those boxes is only half as great as at the old office and the demand for them far exceeded the supply.  It is probable that more will have to be installed later, some of the call boxes being replaced by them.

     A good many business men are grumbling at the long walks that have to take to reach the new office which is — — blocks — — from Pine Street Square in which the old post office is located.  Within a few days everything should be moving along very smoothly at the new quarters by then the business men will have become reconciled to the long walk.   

And here is all of Page Three of the Evening Leader for January 10, 1910.

Have a great weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

https://www.ssclibrary.org/research/online-resources/

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

Local History Photos January 14, 2022

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Local History photos are published on Fridays; and the next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January 21, 2022

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: The Indian Monument in Painted Post, N.Y. (date unknown)

Our first photo for this week shows the Indian Monument in Painted Post with a sign for the Susquehanna Trail nestled against it. The exact date the photo was taken is unknown; however, judging by the cars seen in the background, I’m guessing the photo was taken in 1930s.

Local History Photo 2: Post Card Pine Street and Erie Avenue looking South, Corning, N.Y.

I love this obviously sent post card in Corning – one wonders who “Uncle Frank” was though!

I spent my early grade school years living in an apartment across the street from Courthouse Park; and you can see that section of Pine Street as it is rising up the hill in the background; and the street was different then, and now, then it was when this neat old photo was taken.

As a kid I spent a lot of time running up and down Pine Street and visiting Woolworths for candy; so Pine Street is one of my favorite Corning Streets. Woolworths of course, wasn’t built yet when this photo was taken. Instead, we see the Corning Opera House and Conservatory of Music on the right near where Woolworth’s would later be built; and the building on the left, which is still standing, has been known by different names over time from the Heerman & Lawrence Building to the Githler Tanner building.

And if you look closely, in the background on the left, you can see the steeple of the First Presbyterian Church.

And of course the fact that the street is unpaved is also neat – although I’d imagine it was a muddy mess when it rained!

Local History Photo 3: Painted Post Schools, Painted Post, N.Y. (date unknown)

Our third photo for this week shows the Painted Post area school buildings in winter at some time in the past.

Old Newspaper Article of the Week:

Ads from the Corning Journal, Corning N.Y. | Wednesday, January 5, 1898

What a cool bunch of ads from January 1898; from book binding service to J E. Barber’s Livery, to holiday prices for nickel and copper ware, to business card from prominent locals and even the fact that the price of the Corning Journal, then in its 8th year of publication – was 2 cents!

Super cool! Times have sure changed since 1898 – today I’d be looking for the best auto mechanic for my car and not a livery service – but old newspapers are just plain cool for the window the open on the past!

And here is the entire front page of the

Corning Daily Journal, Corning N.Y. | Wednesday, January 5, 1898

And here is the entire front page of the newspaper, featuring the cool ads.

Have a great weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

https://www.ssclibrary.org/research/online-resources/

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

Local History Photos January 7, 2022

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Local History photos are published on Fridays; and the next local history photo posting will be up on Friday, January 14, 2022.

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photo 1: The Elks Club in Corning

Our fist photo for this week shows the Elks Club lodge in Corning at an unknown date. The building is still standing, on the corner of Walnut and West First Street in Corning; although they did add a difference face to the front of the building at some point.

Local History Photo 2: Erwin Estate

Our second photo for this week shows the old Erwin Estate located on Canada Road in Painted Post. The date the photo was taken is unknown but the Greek Revival home is still standing.

Local History Photo 3: A Very Muddy Pine Street

Our third photo for this week shows a very muddy Pine Street in Corning, looking down the hill toward the Pine Street Bridge. We don’t know when the photo was taken but it was certainly before Pine Street was paved. What a cool photo! The cars are cool, the clock tower in the distance is cool too; and if you look closely at the left top corner of the photo – you can see the courthouse.

What a wonderful view of Corning in the days of old!

Old Newspaper Article of the Week

“Some” Game On Tomorrow Night At Post

From The Evening Leader, Corning, N.Y. | January 14, 1920 | Page 3

For ease of reading, here is the text of the article:

From The Evening Leader, Corning, N.Y. | January 14, 1920 | Page 3

“SOME” GAME ON TOMORROW NIGHT AT POST

Shepard Electrics and Imperials Will Clash in One of Best Games of Season

     It is all settled and Corningites are going to get a chance to see one of the best games that could be staged when the Ingersoll-Rand quintette takes the floor against the Shepard Electrics of Montour Falls tomorrow night in Bronson Hall at Painted Post.

     Now it isn’t a matter of heresay or “maybe” –it is a case of fact wit they Electrics. They have established an enviable record in the past years and they have lived up to it in grand style so far this season. . Of course, one of their mainstays is “Les” Brown a brother of Harry Brown of the Leader force, for years pivot man on the Cornell Varsity and one of their principal pointgetters.  “Les” has a host of admirers among Corningites who are anxiously waiting to see the big boy in action.  And he is only one –there are four more taking up the quintette and when they start “ooh baby, watch ‘em go.”

     Saunders, Parameter, Rundell and Martin will probably complete the lineup of that five.

    But you know Manager Dailey’s gang is anything but second-raters and if the visitors win, it will be anything but a pink tea social.  The locals have practiced steadfastly for this contest and will put forth every effort to win.  In all probability, they will use the same lineup they did against the Coleman Memorials and that means “Tank” Edwards, “Bill” O’Brien Whitmore, “Bill” Brady and “Jimmy” Erwin.

     As a preliminary to the big game St. Mary’s Cadets and the Painted Post High School Five will clash. It will be a large evening for basketball fans who are promised one of the best games of the season.

Here is all of page 3, for your perusal:

Have a great weekend everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

Local History Online Library Resources:

Heritage Quest: Heritage Quest is the library’s online genealogy service, and it includes access to census records and other research sources; it can be accessed by going to the Online Resources page, on the library’s website, and scrolling down until you see the link for Heritage Quest:

https://www.ssclibrary.org/research/online-resources/

Once you’ve clicked on the Heritage Quest link, you’ll be prompted to login with your card number and PIN. If you have questions about how to use Heritage Quest, please feel free to let me know – my email address is reimerl@stls.org

Enjoy the photos and be well everyone,

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!