Wing And Bostwick Store

Hi everyone, here is a neat local history item of note!

I had a patron inquire today, where the old Wing and Bostwick Store was located.

So I went to my trusty Dimitroff-Janes book,* and looked up info on the store!

The author’s state: “Wing and Bostwick on the Northside was one of the largest retail stores in the city, selling a variety of goods.”

So the store was a big deal in its day!

The store was housed in a fine old three story building on the corner of Bridge and Pulteney Streets, across from what is today the Bridge Street Laundry Store.

 

Here is the photo:

What a great old building!

Have a great day!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

References

*History of the Corning Painted Post Area by Thomas Dimitroff & Lois Janes, Revised 1991 Edition. Published by Bookmarks.

Local History Photos January 17, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

This weeks’ posting is going to be a bit different! I did some research for a patron this week on the Bridge Street Bridge; the current Bridge Street Bridge which was completed in November of 1937.

And according to the information in the Corning Evening Leader, it was quite a bit deal when the bridge opened! 10,000 people attended the opening of the bridge, they had a parade and100 musicians played!

So here are photos of some of the stories in the Leader in the days just before and after the bridge opening, followed by two photos that show the bridge under construction:

 

Stories on the Bridge Street Bridge Opening from the Corning Evening Leader

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos of the Bridge Street Bridge while under construction

 

 

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!

Local History Photos January 10, 2020

Hi everyone, here are the Local History Photos of the Week!

Helpful Photo Viewing Tips are found at the end of the posting for anyone who would like a few tips on how best to view the photos*

Local History Photos 1 – 3:

 

 

 

These three photos seem show an archaeology crew and the items that they found during a local dig, possible on Big Island in Elmira…

The only information about the photos in our records is that they were donated by The Drake Family.

If you know anything about this archaeology dig or the dig crew let us know!

Year Book Snapshot:

This is the North Side singing quartet of 1924 featuring, from left to right, William Graffouliere as 1st tenor, Raymond Long as 2nd Tenor, John Adams as Baritone and Lloyd Everts as Bass.

The photo, from the June 1924 North Star, is a bit crooked as the yearbook is a bit fragile so I didn’t want to break the spine to get a good scan.

Have a great weekend!

Linda Reimer, SSCL

*To Create A Larger View (make the photos appear bigger on your screen):

You can click on each photo for a larger view. And then click the back arrow on your web browser to go back to the previous screen.

Alternatively, you can press and hold down the CTRL key, on your keyboard, while tapping the + key on your keyboard to make the photos appear larger on your screen.

To Create A Smaller View (make the photos appear smaller on your screen – after you’ve made them appear larger):

 Press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard and tap the – sign to make the photos appear smaller again.

And If You Use A Mouse – CTRL & Scroll:

If you use a mouse you can do what is called “control and scroll”, to make photos appear larger and then smaller on your screen. To do this –>press and hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard and push the scroll wheel on your mouse away from you for a larger view. To reverse the larger view hold down the same CTRL key on your keyboard and pull the scroll wheel on your mouse towards you.

Library Local History/Creation Station Resources:
At the library you can scan your photos and slides to create digital family albums and slideshows; and even use one of the Circut machines, and other Creation Station equipment, to help you create a special paper family history album.

Also of note, we have the local paper, at times called the Corning Leader, Corning Journal or Corning Daily Journal, on microfilm from 1840 to the present — so you can visit the library and research local history and your family tree if you wish!

And…

And if you find any old photos or postcards of the Corning area that you don’t know what to do with – you can always donate them to the library!